Atomic Energy Commission of Syria

 
   

  Physics

 

Wed 25 Mar 2015. Researchers have shed new light on the fundamental mechanisms of heat dissipation in graphene and other two-dimensional materials. They have shown that heat can propagate as a wave over very long distances. This is key information for engineering the electronics of tomorrow. In the race to miniaturize electronic components, researchers are challenged with a major problem: the smaller or the faster your device, the more challenging it is to cool it down. One solution to improve the cooling is to use materials with very high thermal conductivity, such as graphene, to quickly dissipate heat and thereby cool down the circuits. Researchers have demonstrated that heat propagates in the form of a wave, just like sound in air. This was up to now a very obscure phenomenon observed in few cases at temperatures close to the absolute zero.Their simulations provide a valuable tool for researchers studying graphene, whether to cool down circuits at the nanoscale, or to replace silicon in tomorrow's electronics. More

 

  Chemistry

 

Tue 24 Mar 2015. Chemists develop new way to make cost-effective material for electricity storage. Researchers wanted to find a better way to make coatings that can be painted onto surfaces to conduct electricity or convert electricity into hydrogen fuels. Typically these coatings are developed in extreme conditions with expensive tools and materials. But the researchers developed a technique that allows them to use a consumer grade heat lamp to get the same results. A solution is painted onto a surface and once heated up, it transforms into a catalytic coating. These coatings can be used in a range of technologies, such as flexible electronic devices or to convert electricity into hydrogen fuels. The discovery could have implications for clean energy technologies. More

 

  Energy

 

Thu 26 Feb 2015. Renewable energy obtained from wastewater. Researchers have devised an efficient way to obtain electrical energy and hydrogen by using a wastewater treatment process. The proposed system uses bacteria which consumes the organic material and produces electricity, which produces hydrogen, the energy vector of the future. The results point to further developments of this technology at industrial scale. Currently, there are treatments in which wastewater can flow out to the river or sea without causing any environmental problems. These technologies, however, entail high energy costs, mainly in aeration and pumping, and an elevated economic cost in treating the sludge left over from the treatment process. Wastewater contains an elevated amount of chemical energy in the form of organic contaminants. In order to make use of this energy, researchers from around the world study ways to recover it in the form of hydrogen, a process which efficiently eliminates organic matter from wastewater. More

 

  Physics

 

Wed 25 Feb 2015. SuperSTEM microscope that can see single atoms is unveiled. The new super powerful electron microscope that can pinpoint the position of single atoms was unveiled at the Science and Technology Research Council's Daresbury Laboratory in Cheshire, England. The microscope will help scientists push boundaries even further in fields such as advanced materials, healthcare and power generation. More

 

نشرة أخبار التقانة الحيوية
نشرة الوقاية الإشعاعية وأمان المصادر المُشعّة
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