Atomic Energy Commission of Syria




Tue 3 Nov 2015. Chemical complexity promises improved structural alloys for next-gen nuclear energy. Designing alloys to withstand extreme environments is a fundamental challenge for materials scientists. Energy from radiation can create imperfections in alloys, so researchers are investigating ways to design structural materials that develop fewer, smaller flaws under irradiation. Advanced structural materials that can withstand radiation are a critical national need for nuclear reactor applications. Next-generation reactors will be expected to serve over longer lifetimes and withstand higher irradiation levels. More




Tue 27 Oct 2015. Breakthrough to the development of energy-saving devices for the next generation. Wide-gap semiconductors such as gallium nitride (GaN) are widely used for optical devices such as blue LED and are also anticipated as materials for next-generation energy saving power devices and solar cells. However, the quality of GaN crystals does not come up to that of conventional semiconductor materials such as silicon (Si) and this prevents GaN from being used for power devices. A group of researchers have recently succeeded in visualizing changes in defect density on the surface of GaN through the laser terahertz emission microscope (LTEM) which measures THz waves generated by laser emission. It was shown that LTEM is useful as a new method for evaluating the quality of wide-gap semiconductors and it is also expected that LTEM will bring a breakthrough in the development of next-generation optical devices, super high frequency devices, and energy devices. More




Wed 7 Oct 2015. The 2015 Nobel Prize for chemistry has been jointly awarded to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich, and Aziz Sancar for mechanistic studies of DNA repair. Having mapped, at a molecular level, how cells repair damaged DNA and safeguard the genetic information, their work has provided fundamental knowledge of how a living cell functions and is, for instance, used for the development of new cancer treatments. They have provided fundamental insights into how cells function, knowledge that can be used, for instance, in the development of new cancer treatments. More




Tue 6 Oct 2015. The Nobel Prize in Physics 2015 recognises Takaaki Kajita in Japan and Arthur B. McDonald in Canada, for their key contributions to the experiments which demonstrated that neutrinos change identities. This metamorphosis requires that neutrinos have mass. The discovery has changed our understanding of the innermost workings of matter and can prove crucial to our view of the universe. A neutrino puzzle that physicists had wrestled with for decades had been resolved. Compared to theoretical calculations of the number of neutrinos, up to two thirds of the neutrinos were missing in measurements performed on Earth. Now, the two experiments discovered that the neutrinos had changed identities. More


نشرة أخبار التقانة الحيوية
نشرة الوقاية الإشعاعية وأمان المصادر المُشعّة
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